LCCMF Collaboration with Vermont Visual Artists

 

our art gallery

Early in the last century Wassily Kandinsky attended a concert in a hotel ballroom in Munich and floated home on a cloud of glorious impressions. The next day, he painted the concert. With Impressions III -- Concert, Abstract Art was born.

In an admittedly less earthshaking way, our Art Gallery was born. The board of LCCMF realized that the euphoric impressions made by our concerts, the scrumptious food at our receptions, and the post-concert conversations of our happy community deserved an appropriate environment. So each year we transform the orchestra rehearsal room at the Elley-Long Music Center into an Art Gallery. Curators Eloise Beil of the Creative Space Gallery in Vergennes and Frederick Noonan have drawn together work by Vermont artists in a rich variety of media and styles. Friends like Robbie Stanley and Carol MacDonald have helped arrange the works, and Gallery Manager Devon Govett manages sales.

Our Art Gallery is open during the entire 9-day summer festival. All the works of art are for sale and 30% of the proceeds of each sale goes directly to support the Festival.  Everyone benefits: Vermont artists are supported, the Festival is supported, and you will gain a permanent treasure for yourself.

The arts give a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, a charm to sadness, and a gaiety and life to everything. --Plato

Somehow, mysteriously but indubitably, all the arts are part of our DNA. We don't know when a parent first sang a lullaby or people first beat drums and danced around a campfire. But we do know that cavemen felt the need for images on the wall at least 40,000 years ago. We invite you to continue this fine tradition by taking home to your own cave or palace something from our gallery.

click here for a list of Past Art Gallery Participants

 

vermont artists and lccmf marketing

To see a World in a Grain of Sand
And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
And Eternity in an hour.
  – William Blake

Blake got it right, pegging in a few lines the way we find the spiritual undercurrents in the world around us. Music is a fleeting art, permanent on the page but only a moment in the air – a glimpse of eternity in an hour, soon gone, though leaving a memory. The visual arts, on the other hand, are satisfyingly concrete. That bit of infinity in the palm of the hand, once created, still hangs there on the wall.  Engaging with imagination a wild flower, a grain of sand, or whatever small particular they fancy, composers and musicians come running to pin down in sound those mysteries of infinity, eternity, and our small lives. Writers and artists celebrate it with words and color.

As Vermonters we cherish our landscape.  When we drive through the countryside, the world unfolds like a painting around us and instills the habit of appreciating beauty.  It is no accident that of all the states Vermont has, per capita, the highest number of resident artists.  A few years ago the LCCMF decided to enlist them to enhance our brochures, posters, and program book. These artists have generously helped spread the word that Bach, Mendelssohn, and Schubert would be visiting Burlington each summer.  

This wonderful group of artists, Carol MacDonald from 2014, Lyna Lou Nordstrom in 2015, Douglas Biklen in 2016, and Jerome Milks this year, have given us the ultimate gift of their original work, allowing us to twist, shape, color, and extract as our marketing needs directed us. 

 

Jerome Milks agreed to let us use several of his stunning tree portraits for the 2017 Festival. Here is the sun over Camel's Hump, an iconic scene from Vermont.

Jerome Milks agreed to let us use several of his stunning tree portraits for the 2017 Festival. Here is the sun over Camel's Hump, an iconic scene from Vermont.

Artist Douglas Biklen let us use his Star Over Rothko for all of our 2016 Festival advertising and program book.  

Artist Douglas Biklen let us use his Star Over Rothko for all of our 2016 Festival advertising and program book.

 

Serenade by Lyna Lou Nordstrom formed the basis of 2015 LCCMF marketing.

Serenade by Lyna Lou Nordstrom formed the basis of 2015 LCCMF marketing.

Carol MacDonald was our first VT Visual Artist Collaborator. Here is her Cello I.

Carol MacDonald was our first VT Visual Artist Collaborator. Here is her Cello I.

Here are some short notes from our collaborating artists along with web address so that you can explore their unique visions. We thank them all for the pleasure they have contributed to the Lake Champlain Chamber Music Festival.

2017    Jerome Milks  www.jeromemilks.com

I am a landscape/nature photographer who lives in Waltham, Vermont, a small township near the center of the Champlain Valley. Waltham is flanked by the spine of the Green Mountains to the east and the High Peaks Region of the Adirondacks to the west. Their panoramic ridge lines, accompanied by the numerous streams and rivers that flow from their summits to the Lake Champlain Basin provide for spectacular imaging opportunities.

I am particularly attracted to those times of the day that offer the most dramatic lighting conditions, usually occurring around sunrise and sunset and commonly referred to as the "golden hours." These moments provide intense and highly saturated colors and occasions for sharp contrast and vividness. Though these situations are usually unpredictable and fleeting, they can produce occurrences when the ordinary is morphed into the extraordinary. These unique circumstances offer chances for creating very aesthetically pleasing photographs.

I am hoping that my fine art photographs offer an opportunity for the viewer to give pause to their day and reconnect with this amazing natural world in which we live. Our daily lives can become incredibly busy with endless responsibilities and uneventful routines and art can sometimes offer a sense of peacefulness and balance that may be overlooked or missing. Whether it is a lone hickory tree standing leafless against a deep blue sky, vibrant early dawn colors reflected in still waters or a solo raptor flying across a stormy horizon, photographs can serve as gentle reminders of the beauty that lies on the other side of our windows. May my photographs also serve as a reminder of the collective responsibility that we all have regarding the stewardship and protection of this delicate blue planet that we all refer to as our home.

2016    Douglas Biklen  www.biklenartphotography.com

With his series called Surface Scenes, Biklen looks closely at the surfaces of sailboats in dry dock in various states of repair and repainting.  With saturated colors his photographs evoke landscape scenery, but do not reproduce it.  The space just above and below the waterline, especially if recorded during the refurbishing process, are remindful of scenes in the purely natural world. Sometimes the colors or textures are unusual, adding to the mystery of the work -- red mountains rise above a rough sea, spikes of white appear as snow-covered grasses reaching for the night sky, or the layered strokes to cleanse white paint from a brush become a star.

2015    Lyna Lou Nordstrom  www.lynalouline.com

Color and energy drive my work.  Background music creates the rhythm.  A direction emerges taking control of the artwork.  I allow the piece to tell me what comes next!  By absorbing the essence of yellow sunflowers, persimmon sunsets, bark textures on trees and wave patterns created by wind on water, I create a vocabulary -- the distillation of nature around me.  The process is a combination of wild abandon and deliberate mark making.  If I get out of the way, the art creates itself. My prints reflect what I love and are filled with nuances to be enjoyed for a long time.

2014    Carol MacDonald  www.carolmacdonald.com

On birds, knitting, and print-making: I am interested in the use of repetition and process in knitting and in healing and nurturing our spirits in this age of instant technology with a million distractions. The abstract pattern created through knitting is endlessly fascinating. Opening up stitches to expose the twists and turns yarn takes as it makes a fabric feels akin to exposing the great secrets of life ... My bird series developed out of nest images and feathers. Birds live on the earth and in the sky, creating a link to body and spirit, like our own spirit bridging heaven and earth. In their ability to fly and survey the earth, they hold the big picture with changing perspectives as well as the small details of life.